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3 months ago

Rosa (a guest user) asked this question:

Language pair:

French > English

Subject:

General

Level of diffculty:

Easy / medium

Word or term in question:

PPR prescrit ou approuvé

Context:

PPR = Plan de Prévention de Risques
obviously approuvé = approved

Is prescrit simply translated as "prescribed"?

Keywords:

environmental appendix to commercial lease

 

 

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Answers on this question

3 months ago

Ffion Marianne Moyle  See my profile wrote:

The proposed plan prevention risk potentially approved and/or authorise

My comment:

Various ways of translating this

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3 months ago

elvis  See my profile wrote:

Plan prevention risk obviously approved.

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3 months ago

martynback  See my profile wrote:

specified or approved

My comment:

in other words it has either been specifically stipulated that this plan should be used, or its use has been authorized.

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3 months ago

CMD  See my profile wrote:

Risk Prevention Plan as prescribed and approuved

My comment:

OR ... as (legally) prescribed / regular / in due form / according to regulations and approved

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Comments by other colleagues on this answer:

3 months ago

CMD  See profile wrote:

SORRY for mistype! Risk Prevention Plan as prescribed and approved

3 months ago

martynback  See profile wrote:

or, not and...

3 months ago

CMD  See profile wrote:

"ou" + la traduction par "and": "Ou" en tant que conjonction de coordination est bien ambiguë! Primo, emploi INCLUSIF, i.e. "ou" peut être remplacé par "et"! Secundo, emploi EXCLUSIF, i.e. "ou" peut être remplacé par "ou bien". Enfin, tertio, elle prend un sens ÉQUIVALENT, i.e. elle signifie "c'est-à-dire". [cf Grevisse, le bon usage; LRobert; Grammaires méthodiques etc] HERE: Both steps are required, i.e. "Complying with the regulations AND approval"! ERGO, <<The Plan must comply with (legal) regulations AND be approved!>>

3 months ago

martynback  See profile wrote:

I’m aware of this. But here it’s an exclusive « ou ». Soit on prescrit (= on dit ce qui DOIT être fait) soit on autorise (= on dit ce qui PEUT être fait). La chose est soit prescrite, soit autorisée.

3 months ago

martynback  See profile wrote:

"specify or authorize" / "specification or authorization" are common in contracts. Here "specify" doesn't always just mean "préciser", it means "supply specifications for", which involves the notion of "prescription": telling people what they should do, like a doctor prescribing a drug.

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3 months ago

Barbara R. Cochran, MFA  See my profile wrote:

Comments by other colleagues on this answer:

3 months ago

martynback  See profile wrote:

"ou" means "or" not "and"... approved and authorized mean substantially the same thing.

3 months ago

Barbara R. Cochran, MFA  See profile wrote:

What you claim is nothing more than a basic translation of "ou". And there is nothing that says a document or other text is never redundant.

3 months ago

Barbara R. Cochran, MFA  See profile wrote:

Besides, "approve" and "authorize" do not mean the same thing : "authorization" comes after "approval" : http://www.differencebetween.net/language/difference-between-approve-and-authorize/

3 months ago

martynback  See profile wrote:

But Barbara, prescrire doesn’t mean to approve.

3 months ago

Barbara R. Cochran, MFA  See profile wrote:

That's correct, Martyn. In this case, "prescrit" would mean "authorized".

3 months ago

martynback  See profile wrote:

But prescrire doesn't mean to authorize either! When a doctor prescribes drugs, he's not authorizing you to take them, he's telling you it's what you should do. Even outside the medical context that's what prescrire means.

3 months ago

Barbara R. Cochran, MFA  See profile wrote:

"Prescrire" can be translated as "mandated" or "ordered", in some cases. If you look at synonyms for "mandated" and "ordered", you will find that "authorized" is listed as one among others.

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