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2 months ago

Rosa (a guest user) asked this question:

Language pair:

French > English

Subject:

Medical

Level of diffculty:

Easy / medium

Word or term in question:

accrochage

Context:

Déchirure de la coiffre des rotateurs de l'épaule gauche

EXAMEN PHYSIQUE
A l'examen physique, il n'y a pas d'atrophie. La rotation externe est à [illegible] degrés. La rotation internet est à [illegible].
L'accrochage est négatif. La rotation externe résistée est négative.


Is this supposed to mean that there is no popping or snapping or...?
Already checked a few sites and did searches but still unsure.

 

 

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Answers on this question

2 months ago

Barbara R. Cochran, MFA  See my profile wrote:

diagnosis of frozen shoulder/impingment syndrome ruled out

My comment:

I think this is how I would translate it, given that it has been determined through a physical test or examination.

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2 months ago

Charles Ferguson  See profile wrote:

On a French website I found, there is a photo of a woman with an obvious dropped shoulder and the caption reads "accrochage".Rosa's query mentions "rotator cuff tear" and shoulder drop is a possible sequel. In my discharge letter for Rosa, I would have rendered "accrochage négatif" as "no shoulder drop" This is standard UK medspeak.

2 months ago

Barbara R. Cochran, MFA  See profile wrote:

Sorry, "impingEment".

2 months ago

Barbara R. Cochran, MFA  See profile wrote:

Hi Charles. What I found is that a frozen shoulder comes about "often" as a result of a rotator cup injury: https://www.uptodate.com/contents/frozen-shoulder-beyond-the-basics. Also, that it is considered to be the most serious of all the sequelae that can come about as the result of a rotator cup injury: https://www.medicinenet.com/rotator_cuff/article.htm. Aren't they talking about the ability of the patient, in this case, to move her/his arm after the injury? I had a frozen shoulder for 10 years, and could do almost nothing with it.

2 months ago

Charles Ferguson  See profile wrote:

Sorry, Barbara, no impingement, I agree, (and no offence), BUT...the right translation here is for shoulder drop. Accrocher can mean "to hang" as for a picture on a wall. Rosa is talking about a dislocation of the gleno-humeral joint.

2 months ago

Barbara R. Cochran, MFA  See profile wrote:

Well, if you have contacted Rosa and she told you that the medical report specifically refers to a dislocation of the gleno-humeral joint, maybe she should go with your suggestion. But I also found the following link and it refers to an arm drop test, not the actual condition of shoulder droop, and the context of the question refers to an actual test: https://www.uofazcenteronaging.com/care-sheet/providers/shoulders-four-common-shoulder-problems-older-adults. But that source is an American one, not British. So the correct translation might depend on which variant of English Rosa needs. Anyway, I gotta run to get around and run to my own doctor's appointment in a few. See you later!

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2 months ago

Charles Ferguson  See my profile wrote:

shoulder drop

My comment:

This patient probably has a rotator cuff tear but does not have shoulder drop. Accrocher can mean to hang.

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2 months ago

CMD  See my profile wrote:

(shoulder) impingement syndrome

My comment:

(shoulder) impingement syndrome: tests are negative
OR (Subacrominal) impingement tests are negative....

ad déf., expl. "shoulder impingement syndrome"
https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/7079-shoulder-impingement-syndrome [ibid Overview] ; https://www.physio-pedia.com/Subacromial_Pain_Syndrome ; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3826176/ ; https://www.physio-pedia.com/Hawkins_/_Kennedy_Impingement_Test_of_the_Shoulder

ad déf. "accrochage" cf https://www.avocatslaportelavallee.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/volume.pdf [NB 3.2.1 etc.]

My references:

[NB ad "snap" --> Snap Test - test for subluxation of LHB. The examiner palpates the biceps groove with one hand whilst the other hand rotates the shoulder.] [https://www.shoulderdoc.co.uk/section/497%2015]

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2 months ago

CMD  See profile wrote:

Note: (Dict LR) accrochage : le fait d'accrocher -> "presenter des difficultés de fonctionnement, des accrocs" !

2 months ago

CMD  See profile wrote:

[info suppl.] NB ad "syndrome d'accrochage de l'épaule" : shoulder impingement syndrome OR subacromial impingement syndrome --> http://traduction.sensagent.com/SYNDROME%20D%20ACCROCHAGE%20DE%20L%20EPAULE/fr-en/

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2 months ago

plaisirsdelavie  See my profile wrote:

no sign of frozen shoulder/ no impingement syndrom

My references:

https://dictionnaire.reverso.net/francais-anglais/accrochage+d%27%C3%A9paule

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Comments by other colleagues on this answer:

2 months ago

plaisirsdelavie  See profile wrote:

The "popping, snapping and clicking" is the symptom, but the cause is the impingement syndrom.

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2 months ago

English -French - English  See my profile wrote:

Comments by other colleagues on this answer:

2 months ago

plaisirsdelavie  See profile wrote:

the snapping of the shoulder is a dysfunction, so you cannot say it is "right".

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